Jesuit Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio S.J. is Announced As the 266th Pope Named Francis I

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2292549/Papal-conclave-New-Pope-76-year-old-Argentine-Jorge-Bergoglio-Archbishop-Buenos-Aires-announced-world-266th-pontiff.html

‘Pray for me,’ 76-year-old Argentinian Jorge Bergoglio asks the world as he is announced as 266th pontiff… to be named Francis I

  • Electors sent up white smoke at 6pm GMT indicating that a new Pope had been chosen after two days of voting
  • New Pontiff unveiled as Argentine Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the Archbishop of Buenos Aires
  • Pope Francis appeared before thriving crowd on the balcony of St.Peter’s Basilica at 7pm GMT

By Hugo Gye and Simon Tomlinson

PUBLISHED: 04:34 EST, 13 March 2013 | UPDATED: 14:57 EST, 13 March 2013

The new Pope has been unveiled as Argentine Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the Archbishop of Buenos Aires, who will take the name Pope Francis I.

The 76-year-old was welcomed by tens of thousands of overjoyed Catholics in St. Peter’s Square in the Vatican City after his election was revealed this afternoon at 6pm GMT when white smoke poured out of the chimney of the Sistine Chapel.

Pope Francis becomes the first South American Pontiff and the first Jesuit to hold the title. His South American origin is a significant move for the Church, taking the Papacy to a continent in which 42 per cent of the world’s Catholics live.

The reformist becomes the third non-Italian Pope in a row, having being born and spent his life in the Argentinian capital.

Scroll down for video and live footage

A first: The 76-year-old, unveiled as Jorge Mario Bergoglio, becomes both the first South American and Jesuit Pope vA first: The 76-year-old, unveiled as Jorge Mario Bergoglio, becomes both the first South American and Jesuit Pope

He began his address to the crowd with a joke, saying that his brother cardinals had gathered to pick a bishop of Rome 'and they have chosen one from far away but here I am'. He then asked for prayers for his living predecessor. Joker: He began his address to the crowd with a joke, saying that his brother cardinals had gathered to pick a bishop of Rome ‘and they have chosen one from far away but here I am’

Argentinian cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio
Newly elected Pope Francis I

Talented: Pope Francis I, the first pontiff to have chosen that papal title,  speaks German, Italian and Spanish

Celebrations: Faithful react as white smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel Celebrations: Catholics react as white smoke rises from the chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel

Decision made: White smokes billows from the chimney on the Sistine Chapel indicating that a new Pontiff has been elected by Cardinals Decision made: White smokes billows from the chimney on the Sistine Chapel indicating that a new Pontiff has been elected by Cardinals

He began his address to the crowd with a joke, saying that his brother cardinals had gathered to pick a bishop of Rome ‘and they have chosen one from far away but here I am’.  He then asked for prayers for his living predecessor.

He said: ‘First and foremost I would like to pray for our emeritus Pope Benedict XVI that Christ and the Madonna watch over him.

‘Let us being this journey together, this journey for the Roman Catholic Church. It’s a journey of friendship and love and faith between us. Let us pray for one another, let us pray for all the world.’

Then he asks the crowd to be silent for a moment and pray for him as he accepted his new position. ‘I’d ask you to pray to God so that he can bless me,’ Pope Francis said, leading a silent prayer, followed by a loud cheer from the crowd.

He said that the world ‘should set off on a path of love and fraternity’, leaving the address by saying to the crowds: ‘Good night and I wish you a peaceful rest.’

Pope Francis is multilingual, speaking German, Spanish and Italian.

Tens of thousands cheered in St. Paul’s Square at the sight of the symbolic plumes, announcing that the successor to Benedict XVI had finally been chosen after two days of intense voting.

After hours braving the cold rain, the huge crowd chanted ‘Habemus Papam’ and ‘We have a pope’ – as the bells of St. Peter’s Basilica and other churches across Rome pealed.

As excitement grew before the Pope Francis’s imminent appearance on the loggia, the crowd repeated the refrain ‘Viva il Papa’ – translated as ‘Long live the Pope’.

The new Pope was dressed in his papal robes and joined in prayer with the other cardinals before his appearance.

The conclave was called after Pope Benedict XVI resigned last month for health reasons, sending the church into turmoil and exposing deep divisions among cardinals tasked with finding a replacement to address issues within the church.

Getting ready: Swiss guards enter St Peter's Square shortly before the new Pope's unveiling Getting ready: Swiss guards enter St Peter’s Square shortly before the new Pope’s unveiling

Jubilation: The conclave was called after Pope Benedict XVI resigned last month for health reasonsJubilation: The conclave was called after Pope Benedict XVI resigned last month for health reasons

 

Standing by: Two Swiss guards, the Pope's personal protection, standing below the balcony Standing by: Two Swiss guards, the Pope’s personal protection, standing below the balcony

Excitement: Crowds gathered beneath the chimney awaiting the symbolic smoke and applauded when white smoke finally emerged Excitement: Crowds gathered beneath the chimney awaiting the symbolic smoke and applauded when white smoke finally emerged

Giving thanks: One Catholic in the Vatican City raised his hands and looked to the skies as the white smoke signified a decision had been madeGiving thanks: One Catholic in the Vatican City raised his hands and looked to the skies as the white smoke signified a decision had been made

Show of faith: One Catholic stands with a sign reading 'Viva il Papa', translated as 'Long live the Pope'Show of faith: One Catholic stands with a sign reading ‘Viva il Papa’, translated as ‘Long live the Pope’

So pleased: Crowds have waited in rain and cold temperatures before being sent into rapture by the decision So pleased: Crowds have waited in rain and cold temperatures before being sent into rapture by the decision

Overview: The thriving crowd pictured outside the Sistine Chapel eagerly anticipating the appearance of the new Pontiff on the balcony Overview: The thriving crowd pictured outside the Sistine Chapel eagerly anticipating the appearance of the new Pontiff on the balcony

With no clear frontrunner in the race to become Pope, crowds had not such an immediate decisionWith no clear frontrunner in the race to become Pope, crowds had not such an immediate decision

Applause: As the white smoke emerged from the chimney, thousands of Catholics burst into applause at the unexpected decision Applause: As the white smoke emerged from the chimney, thousands of Catholics burst into applause at the unexpected decision

Ignoring the rain: Despite the grisly weather, those gathered waved flags and cheered as they awaited Benedict XVI's replacement Ignoring the rain: Despite the grisly weather, those gathered waved flags and cheered as they awaited Benedict XVI’s replacement

Chants of `Long live the pope’ arose from the throngs of Catholics, many with tears in their eyes and the crowds buzzed with excitement as the Vatican and Italian military bands marched through the square and up the steps of the basilica.

They were followed by Swiss Guards, dressed in silver helmets and full regalia.

A result on only the first full day of voting in the Papal election surprised many who thought that the process would take several days.

This was because there appeared to be no clear front runner in the election of the 266th Pontiff. It was also thought it may be longer conclave as the previous Pope had not died.

The election of the new Pope had one more ballot as that in 2005 when Joseph Ratzinger was elected and became Benedict XVI in what was one of the quickest elections of all time.

On the first evening of that election black smoke appeared from the Sistine Chapel’s chimney before a further two votes the following morning did not get a result either. However the third ballot saw Benedict XVI elected after only 26 hours of debate.

The election of the new Pope is likely to be among the fastest of all time, alongside the conclave that saw Pius Xii chosen after 20 hours in 1939.

The longest conclave of the last century went on for 14 rounds over five days, and yielded Pius XI – in 1922.

The October 1978 conclave, called when Pope John Paul I died just after 33 days in office, saw cardinals vote eight times before Karol Wojtyla was chosen and became Pope John Paul II.

Pope John Paul I’s conclave two months earlier again had only four ballots before he was chosen.

Disappointment: Black smoke emerged out of the chimney of the Sistine Chapel around 10.40am GMT to signify the cardinals were deadlocked

Disappointment: Black smoke emerged out of the chimney of the Sistine Chapel around 10.40am GMT to signify the cardinals were deadlocked

No result: Smoke rose over the roofs of the Vatican to indicate that the Pope had not yet been chosen this morning

No result: Smoke rose over the roofs of the Vatican to indicate that the Pope had not yet been chosen this morning

Historic: The visitors in Rome were hoping to witness a moment which will doubtless go down in history

Historic: The visitors in Rome were hoping to witness a moment which will doubtless go down in history

VIDEO: Moment the new Pope emerged onto the balcony in Rome

These modern-day conclaves are extremely short though in comparison to the election of Gregory XI in 1271.

His election took three years thanks to political infighting between cardinals, during which twenty of the those chosen to elect the pope died and one resigned.

Thousands of faithful Catholics had waited in the rain outside the Sistine Chapel eagerly anticipating a decision.

The pilgrims were disappointed this morning, when the cardinals failed to make a decision after voting for a second time on a replacement for Benedict XVI.

Black smoke poured out of the chimney of the Sistine Chapel around 10.40am GMT to signify that the latest ballot had resulted in deadlock.

Benedict’s resignation has thrown the church into turmoil and exposed deep divisions among cardinals grappling with whether to pick a manager who can clean up the Vatican bureaucracy or a pastor who can inspire Catholics at a time of crisis.

Before the announcement of a new Pontiff, the red-hatted and red-caped cardinals yesterday chanted and prayed for divine guidance as they prepared for a conclave to choose a pontiff who will face one of the most difficult periods in the Church’s history.

Undeterred: The size of the crowd did not seem to be negatively affected by the foul weather over RomeUndeterred: The size of the crowd did not seem to be negatively affected by the foul weather over Rome

 

Sightseeing: A group of nuns in the Vatican's main square looking towards the Sistine ChapelSightseeing: A group of nuns in the Vatican’s main square looking towards the Sistine Chapel

 

Crowd: Thousands of the faithful have gathered in Rome to welcome the new Pope once he is electedCrowd: Thousands of the faithful have gathered in Rome to welcome the new Pope once he is elected

International: The Catholics gathered in Rome have assembled from around the world for the big occasion
Waiting for the Pope

Flags: Many of the bystanders were accompanied either by their national colours, left, or by the banner of the Vatican itself, right

 

International: The Catholics gathered in Rome have assembled from around the world for the big occasionInternational: The Catholics gathered in Rome have assembled from around the world for the big occasion

 

Pilgrim: A man kneels in prayer in a rain-slicked St Peter's Square while cardinals gather in the chapelPilgrim: A man kneels in prayer in a rain-slicked St Peter’s Square while cardinals gather in the chapel

‘MY SON’S NOT UP TO BEING POPE’

The mother of one of the leading candidates for the papacy has said she does not think he is equipped to handle the job.

Eleonore Schoenborn, the 92-year-old mother of Austrian cardinal Christoph Schoenborn, told the Kleine Zeitung newspaper that being Pope ‘is much too difficult for him’.

She added that the Archbishop of Vienna was too gentle to handle ‘the nastiness at the Vatican’, saying he already had trouble ‘dealing with the intrigues in Vienna’.

The matriarch also complained that if her son became Pope, ‘I’ll never see Christoph again – because I don’t have the strength to go to Rome.’

In St. Peter’s Square, there was a fleeting moment of indecision when the first plumes of smoke appeared from the Vatican chimney.

Some cried out that it was black, signifying that no decision was made by the conclave. Then, seconds later under a steady rain, it became clear that white smoke was pouring out.

They gathered in the Pauline Chapel and walked in procession along the frescoed halls of the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace into the Sistine.

‘The entire Church, united with us in prayer, asks for the grace of the Holy Spirit at this moment so that we elect a worthy shepherd for the entire flock of Christ,’ a cardinal said in Latin as the procession began.

They then chanted what is known as the ‘litany of saints’, asking more than 150 saints by name for help in making their choice of who should succeed Benedict XVI, who has withdrawn from public life after his surprise abdication last month

Once inside the Sistine, they took their places along the walls of the frescoed chapel and sang a hymn to the Holy Spirit, asking it to ‘visit our minds’ during the election process.

They then read an oath in Latin, promising to abide by all the rules of the conclave, including not to reveal anything that goes on during the conclave.

Some analysts had expected a relatively lengthy conclave as there was seen to be no frontrunner to succeed Benedict, who became the first pope in six centuries to step down, saying he was not strong enough at 85 to confront the woes of a Church whose 1.2 billion members look to Rome for leadership.

Drenched: A worshipper crosses herself as she prays in front of St Peter's Basilica during the conclaveDrenched: A worshipper crosses herself as she prays in front of St Peter’s Basilica during the conclave

Waiting for the Pope
Waiting for the Pope

Sodden: The faithful were soaked in the rain as they waited for confirmation of a new Pope

On duty: Even the Vatican gendarmes had to cover up to defend against the weather in St Peter's SquareOn duty: Even the Vatican gendarmes had to cover up to defend against the weather in St Peter’s Square

 

Smoke – white for a new pontiff, black after an inconclusive vote – emerges from the chimney on the Sistine’s roof every time a ballot is held

The balloting for the next pontiff took place under the gaze of the divine presence represented through Michelangelo’s fresco of the Last Judgment, located on the wall behind the altar.

The solemn afternoon procession into the Sistine followed a morning Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica where Angelo Sodano, an Italian who is dean of the cardinals, called for unity in the Church, which has been riven with intrigue and scandal, and urged everyone to work with the next pope.

Cardinals chanting the Latin hymn 'Veni Creator Spiritus' (Come Creator Spirit) in the Sistine Chapel before the start of the conclaveCardinals chanting the Latin hymn ‘Veni Creator Spiritus’ (Come Creator Spirit) in the Sistine Chapel before the start of the conclave

On their way: Cardinals Giovanni Lajolo and Tarcisio Bertone entering the Sistine Chapel to begin the conclave on WednesdayOn their way: Cardinals Giovanni Lajolo and Tarcisio Bertone entering the Sistine Chapel to begin the conclave on Wednesday

Treading an uncertain path: Cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel to begin the conclave to elect a successor to Pope BenedictTreading an uncertain path: Cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel to begin the conclave to elect a successor to Pope Benedict

Italy’s Angelo Scola and Brazil’s Odilo Scherer had been spoken of as the possible frontrunners.

The former would return the papacy to Italy after 35 years in the hands of Poland’s John Paul II and the German Benedict, while Scherer would be the first non-European pope since Syrian-born Gregory III in the 8th century.

On the eve of the vote, cardinals offered wildly different assessments of what they were looking for in the next pontiff and how close they were to a decision.

It was evidence that Benedict XVI’s surprise resignation has continued to destabilise the church leadership and that his final appeal for unity may go unheeded, at least in the early rounds of voting.

 

‘My brothers, let us pray that the Lord will grant us a pontiff who will embrace this noble mission with a generous heart,’ Sodano said in his homily, receiving warm applause when he thanked ‘the beloved and venerable’ Benedict.

The former pontiff, who retired on February 28, has excluded himself from public life and was not present yesterday.

No clear favourite has emerged to take the helm of the Church, with some prelates calling for a strong manager to control the much criticised Vatican bureaucracy, while others want a powerful pastor to combat growing secularism.

 

Anticipation: Cardinals, in red, process through St Peter's Basilica during a mass before they enter the Sistine Chapel to elect the next pope Anticipation: Cardinals, in red, process through St Peter’s Basilica during a mass before they enter the Sistine Chapel to elect the next pope

Putting on the thinking cap: A cardinal puts on his mitre hat during the Mass inside St. Peter's Basilica as a clear front runner has yet to emerge in the papal electionPutting on the thinking cap: A cardinal puts on his mitre hat during the Mass inside St. Peter’s Basilica as a clear front runner has yet to emerge in the papal election

Differences: The cardinals listen to a final appeal for unity within the church from the dean of the College of Cardinals after a turbulent few weeks for the VaticanDifferences: The cardinals listen to a final appeal for unity within the church from the dean of the College of Cardinals after a turbulent few weeks for the Vatican

FIND OUT WHO’S NEXT POPE IN BLACK AND WHITE… BY TEXT

White smoke or black smoke?

Maybe it’s easier just to wait for a text message that a new pope has been elected.

A Catholic organisation has set up a website, http://www.popealarm.com, that lets people register to receive a text or email notification when a pope has been selected.

While the process of selecting a new pope is as old as the ages, there are enough changes to the media to make the last papal conclave – in 2005 – seem like ancient history.

Another new website, http://www.adoptacardinal.org, assigns interested people one of the voting cardinals at random to pray for him as he deliberates on a new pope.

More than 450,000 people had signed up by Monday.

The buzz in the papal stakes swirled around Cardinal Angelo Scola, an Italian seen as favoured by cardinals hoping to shake up the powerful Vatican bureaucracy, and Brazilian cardinal Odilo Scherer, a favourite of Vatican-based insiders intent on preserving the status quo.

Cardinal Scola is affable and Italian, but not from the Italian-centric Vatican bureaucracy called the Curia.

That gives him clout with those seeking to reform the nerve centre of the church that has been discredited by revelations of leaks and complaints from cardinals in the field that Rome is inefficient and unresponsive to their needs.

Cardinal Scherer seems to be favoured by Latin Americans and the Curia.

He has a solid handle on the Vatican’s finances, sitting on the governing commission of the Vatican bank, as well as the Holy See’s main budget committee.

As a non-Italian, the archbishop of Sao Paulo would be expected to name an Italian as secretary of state – the Vatican number two who runs day-to-day affairs – another plus for Vatican-based cardinals who would want one of their own running the shop.

The pastoral camp seems to be focusing on two Americans, New York archbishop Timothy Dolan and Boston archbishop Sean O’Malley. Neither has Vatican experience.

Canadian cardinal Marc Ouellet is well-respected, stemming from his job at the important Vatican office that vets bishop appointments.

If the leading names fail to reach the 77 votes required for victory in the first few rounds of balloting, any number of surprise candidates could come to the fore as alternatives.

During the voting, each cardinal writes his choice on a rectangular piece of paper inscribed with the words ‘Eligo in summem pontificem’ – Latin for ‘I elect as Supreme Pontiff’.

Holding the folded ballot up in the air, each approaches the altar and places it on a saucer, before tipping it into an oval urn, as he intones these words: ‘I call as my witness, Christ the Lord, who will be my judge that my vote is given to the one who, before God, I think should be elected.’

 

First to quit in 600 years: Former pope, Benedict XVI, pictured blessing his followers for the last time as he arrived at Castel Gandolfo last month before his retirementFirst to quit in 600 years: Former pope, Benedict XVI, pictured blessing his followers for the last time as he arrived at Castel Gandolfo last month before his retirement

After the votes are counted, and the outcomes announced, the papers are bound together with a needle and thread, each ballot pierced through the word ‘Eligo’. The ballots are then placed in a cast-iron stove and burned with a special chemical.

That is when all eyes turn to the 6ft copper chimney atop the Sistine Chapel to pipe out puffs of smoke to tell the world if there is a new pope.

Black smoke means ‘not yet’ – the likely outcome after round one. White smoke means the 266th pope has been chosen.

The next pope will face a church in crisis: Benedict spent his eight-year pontificate trying to revive Catholicism amid the secular trends that have made it almost irrelevant in places like Europe, once a stronghold of Christianity.

Clerical sex abuse scandals have soured many faithful and competition from rival evangelical churches in Latin America and Africa has drawn souls away.

Closer to home, leaks of papal documents last year exposed ugly turf battles, allegations of corruption and even a plot purportedly orchestrated by Benedict’s aides to out a prominent Italian Catholic editor as gay.

VOTE FOLLOWS SERIES OF CHOREOGRAPHED RULES HALLOWED BY TRADITION

WHO VOTES?

Only cardinals under age 80 are eligible. In this case, 115 men fit the bill.

Two cardinals who were eligible stayed home: The emeritus archbishop of Jakarta, Cardinal Julius Darmaatjadja, who is ill, and Scottish Cardinal Keith O’Brien, who recused himself after admitting to inappropriate sexual behavior.

WHAT IS THE RITUAL?

The conclave’s first day begins with the ‘Pro eligendo Romano Pontificie’ Mass for the election of a pope.

In the afternoon, cardinals gather in the Pauline Chapel of the Apostolic Palace and file into the Sistine Chapel chanting the Litany of Saints and the Latin hymn ‘Veni Creator,’ imploring saints and the Holy Spirit to help them pick a pope.

Standing under Michelangelo’s ‘Creation’ and before his ‘Last Judgment,’ each cardinal places his hand on a book of the Gospels and pledges ‘with the greatest fidelity’ never to reveal the details of the conclave.

A meditation on the qualities needed for the next pope and the challenges ahead for the church is delivered by Maltese Cardinal Prosper Grech.

The master of liturgical celebrations then cries ‘Extra omnes,’ Latin for ‘all out.’ Everyone except the cardinals leaves and the voting can begin.

HOW DO THEY VOTE?

Each cardinal writes his choice on a paper inscribed with the words ‘Eligo in summen pontificem,’ or ‘I elect as Supreme Pontiff.’

They approach the altar one by one and say: ‘I call as my witness, Christ the Lord who will be my judge, that my vote is given to the one who, before God, I think should be elected.’

The folded ballot is placed on a round plate and slid into an oval silver and gold urn.

In the past, a single chalice was used to hold the ballots. But conclave changes made by Pope John Paul II in 1996 required three vessels: one for chapel ballots, another for ailing cardinals at the Vatican who can vote from their beds and the third to hold the ballots after counting.

WHAT HAPPENS ONCE THE POPE IS ELECTED?

Once a cardinal has been elected pope, the master of liturgical ceremonies enters the Sistine Chapel and the senior cardinal asks ‘Do you accept your canonical election as Supreme Pontiff?’

Assuming the cardinal says ‘I accept,’ the senior cardinal then asks: ‘By what name do you wish to be called?’

The master of liturgical ceremonies, Monsignor Guido Marini, then enters the information on a formal document.

At this point, white smoke pours out of the Sistine Chapel chimney and bells of St Peters toll.

The new pope then changes into his papal white cassock, and one-by-one the cardinals approach him to swear their obedience.

In a change for this conclave, the new pope will stop and pray in the Pauline Chapel for a few minutes before emerging on the loggia of the balcony overlooking St Peter’s Square.

Preceding him to the balcony is French Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, the protodeacon, who announces ‘Habemus Papam!’ Latin for ‘We have a pope’.

The new pope then emerges and delivers his first public words as pope.

The world’s most exclusive tailor which only serves the Vatican

As the world waits to welcome the next Pope, one Italian company is looking forward to meeting its newest customer.

Gammarelli is a tailor’s firm in Rome which has made robes for six Popes over the past 200 years, as well as kitting out hundreds of cardinals and thousands of priests.

Annibale Gammarelli, the 81-year-old great-great-grandson of the company’s founder Antonio, is currently running the business which will provide the new Pope’s outfits.

Gammarelli
Gammarelli

Tailor: Gammarelli has been making clothes for the Vatican for centuries; the shop is pictured left before the 1939 papal conclave and right before this year’s event

The firm has previously made clothes for Pius IX, John XXIII, Paul VI, John Paul I, John Paul II and Benedict XVI.

The Pope’s vestments consist of a robe of ivory wool, a white cassock with 33 buttons symbolising the age of Christ, a skullcap, red leather shoes and a white cape known as a mozzetta.

Because they do not know who the next Pope will be, the tailors have had to prepare versions of the garments in small, medium and large sizes.

Gammarelli
Gammarelli

Hard at work: Employees of the tailor have been busy crafting the vestments which will be worn by the next Pope

Filippo Gammarelli said: ‘The model has remained the same as that mandated by Pius IX, more than one hundred and fifty years ago, and since then all we pack for the Popes responds to these canons, albeit with some license imposed by the various flavours of the Popes.

‘To Pope Luciani – John Paul I – for example, we had to replace the white dress immediately after his elections, because it was wet with tears of his emotion.’

Click the link below to view video:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2292549/Papal-conclave-New-Pope-76-year-old-Argentine-Jorge-Bergoglio-Archbishop-Buenos-Aires-announced-world-266th-pontiff.html

 

 

 

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Posted on March 13, 2013, in Religion / Faith and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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